Information Security

Public Key Cryptography

Symmetric-key cryptosystems order levitra generic use the same key

for encryption and decryption of a message, though a message or group of messages may have a different key than others. A significant disadvantage of symmetric ciphers is the key management necessary to use them securely. Each distinct pair of communicating parties must, ideally, share a different key, and perhaps viagra naturel maca each ciphertext exchanged as well. The number of keys required increases as the square of the number of network members, which very quickly requires complex key management schemes to keep them all consistent and secret. The difficulty of securely establishing a secret key between two communicating parties, when a secure channel does not already exist between them, also presents a chicken-and-egg problem which is a considerable practical obstacle for cryptography users in the real world.

In a groundbreaking 1976 paper, Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman proposed the notion of public-key (also, more generally, called asymmetric key) cryptography in which two different

but mathematically related keys are used—a public key and a private key. A public key system is so constructed that calculation of one key (the ‘private key’) is

computationally infeasible from the other (the ‘public key’), tadalafil vasodilator even though they are necessarily related. Instead, both keys are generated secretly, as an interrelated pair. The historian David Kahn described public-key cryptography as “the most revolutionary new concept in the

field since polyalphabetic substitution emerged

in the Renaissance”.

At CRG, interesting areas of this field including signcryption, identity based encryption, digital signatures and elliptic curve cryptography are currently being researched by the group members.