Info-Security

Quantum Cryptography

Quantum cryptography describes the

use acheter viagra of quantum mechanical effects (in particular quantum communication and quantum computation) to perform cryptographic tasks or to break cryptographic systems.

Well-known examples of quantum cryptography are the use of quantum communication to exchange a key securely (quantum key distribution) and the hypothetical use of quantum computers that would allow the breaking of various popular public-key encryption and signature schemes (e.g. RSA and ElGamal).

The advantage of quantum cryptography lies in the fact that it allows the completion of various cryptographic tasks that are

proven or conjectured to be impossible using only classical (i.e. non-quantum) communication.

The most well known and developed application of quantum cryptography is quantum key distribution (QKD). https://www.viagrasansordonnancefr.com/viagra-en-pharmacie/ QKD describes the process of using quantum communication to establish a shared key between two parties https://www.viagrasansordonnancefr.com/viagra-cialis/ (usually called Alice and Bob) without a third party (Eve) learning anything about that key, even if Eve can eavesdrop on all communication between Alice and Bob. This is achieved by Alice encoding

the bits of

the key as quantum data and sending them to Bob; if Eve tries to learn these bits, the messages will be disturbed and Alice and Bob will notice. The key is then typically used for encrypted communication.

At CRG, group members are currently researching on quantum key distribution and role of quantum cryptography in noise reduction.